Another Facebook whistleblower said she was willing to testify before Congress

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Ms. Zhang, who worked as a data scientist for the tech giant for nearly three years, wrote a lengthy memo when she was fired by Facebook last year, detailing her belief that the company was not doing enough to address hatred and misinformation—especially in terms of scale. Smaller and developing countries. Zhang said the company told her that she was fired due to performance issues.

The memo was first reported by BuzzFeed News last year and later became the basis of a series of reports in The Guardian.

In an interview with CNN at his home in the Bay Area on Sunday, Zhang said that after Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testified to the Senate subcommittee last week, both parties appeared to support actions related to the protection of online children. She feels encouraged.

Whistleblower Frances Haugen will meet with the Facebook Oversight Committee
Zhang said that she has submitted information about Facebook to the authorities. “I provided detailed documents on potential criminal violations to U.S. law enforcement agencies. My understanding is that the investigation is still ongoing,” She tweeted Sunday.

When CNN asked what information she provided or to which organization she provided it, she refused to share it. A spokesperson for the FBI declined to comment on Monday, adding: “The FBI generally does not confirm, deny or otherwise comment on information or tips that we may receive from the public.”

The core of Zhang’s allegations against Facebook is that it did not take sufficient measures to address the abuse of its platform by countries outside the United States. According to the most recent quarterly documents, approximately 90% of Facebook’s monthly active users are outside the United States and Canada.

A Facebook spokesperson rejected the allegation on Monday, saying the company has invested billions of dollars in safety and security in recent years.

“Since 2017, we have also banned more than 150 networks that tried to manipulate public debate. They originated in more than 50 countries, most of which came from or were concentrated outside the United States. Our records show that we have cracked down on foreign The abuse is the same intensity as our application in the United States,” the spokesperson added.

-CNN’s Christina Carrega provided reporting



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