“China does not need to use force”

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Russian President Vladimir Putin will attend the Russia Energy Week International Forum meeting in Moscow on October 13, 2021.

Mikhail Metzer | AFP | Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that China “does not need to use force” to achieve its “unification” with Taiwan.

After a week of tensions in the region, Chinese President Xi Jinping vowed last week to achieve his goal of peacefully placing the democratically administered island nation of 24 million people under Beijing’s control.

China sees Taiwan as a separate province, while Taiwan sees itself as separated from China and has ruled itself since it split from the mainland after a prolonged civil war in 1949.

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen responded in a speech on Sunday, announcing that her government would invest in strengthening its military capabilities to “show our determination to defend ourselves.”

In his speech to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Russian Energy Week meeting in Moscow on Wednesday, Putin pointed out that Xi Jinping’s remarks implied the possibility of peaceful reunification, and China’s “foundation philosophy” implied that there was no military confrontation. threat.

“I don’t think China needs to use force. China is a huge and powerful economy. In terms of purchase parity, China is now the world’s largest economy, ahead of the United States,” the Russian president said. translation.

“By increasing this economic potential, China is capable of achieving its national goals. I don’t see any threats.”

Putin also talked about the tense relations in the South China Sea. Russia has been trying to maintain a neutral stance against China’s long-term and international denial of large areas of nearby waters.

“As for the South China Sea, yes, there are some conflicts and conflicting interests, but Russia’s position is based on the fact that we need to provide opportunities for all countries in the region without interference from non-regional powers, based on the basic norms of international law. Engage in proper dialogue on the Internet,” he said.

“This should be a negotiation process. This is how we should resolve any disputes. I believe this has potential, but it has not been fully utilized so far.”

Clarification: This article has been updated to more accurately reflect that Taiwan has been in a state of autonomy since its split from the mainland in 1949, and it sees itself as separated from China.

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