CNN Poll: Most Democrats are in favor of larger bills on social safety nets and climate

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The economic bill that supports all proposed social safety nets and climate change policies is the most widespread among liberal Democrats (84%), but two-thirds of the moderates and conservatives in the party agree with this view (67 %). Despite this relative agreement, opinion polls also show that Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents have nearly even differences on the issue of which faction is more helpful to the whole party in this intra-party debate.

Politically independent people are very divided on how Congress should handle the economic bill. 36% said that legislators should pass a more comprehensive bill, 32% said they should pass a smaller bill, and 32% said they should pass a smaller bill. People said they should pass nothing.

However, the opinions of independents largely depend on which party they think they are closest to: Most independents who lean toward Democrats say that Congress should pass a complete bill (56%), while most lean toward Republican independence. Someone said that Congress should not pass any version of the bill (60%).

Overall, 41% of Americans said they would prefer to see Congress pass an economic bill that sets out all proposed social safety nets and climate change policies, rather than making fewer policies and lower costs . 30% of people support the reduction bill, and another 29% said they hope that Congress will not pass any version of the bill. This sentiment is mainly driven by Republicans, and 55% of them want to see the entire bill be repealed.

In the ongoing debate surrounding key parts of its agenda, and in the challenging post-coronavirus pandemic, Americans are divided over President Joe Biden’s approval ratings. In the new opinion poll, 50% of people agree and 49% disapproval, which is basically the same as the CNN poll conducted in August and September. The public is also divided over whether Biden did more to unite the country (51%) or divide the country (49%) during his tenure.

Opinion polls have highlighted the challenges faced by the Democrats in providing reasons for these bills, but few people think that this economic bill and infrastructure bill are personally helpful to them. If Congress passes these two bills, only about a quarter (25%) of people say their family will live better, while 32% say their situation will be worse, and 43% say their The situation is roughly the same. Among several groups that are critical to the success of the Democratic Party’s election, the percentage of those who say they will not be affected by these bills has increased, including independent women (59%), blacks (58%), and people under 35 (54%). ), Latino (51%) and mild (50%).

Few Americans, regardless of their political affiliation, pay full attention to congressional negotiations-only 16% of the public, including less than one-fifth of any party, say they have been following the news closely, 42% of Americans Indicates that they did not pay too much attention to the story, or did not pay attention to the story at all. Compared with the more widely watched story, in December 2019, 42% of Americans paid very close attention to Congress’s impeachment hearing against then President Donald Trump, and only about a quarter said they did not give too much focus on.

In most cases, Americans who are attentive and less involved have similar views on how Congress should act. However, those who did not pay close attention to the debate were about twice as likely as those who believed that the passage of the bill would not have much impact on their families. Among party members, attentive Democrats are more likely to say that these bills will help their families than people who don’t pay much attention, and Republicans who pay attention to at least a certain extent are more likely than less committed Republicans. Say that these bills will hurt them.

Disagreements within the Democratic Party

Negotiations on the economic bill have allowed moderate Democrats to compete in the Senate with liberal Democrats in the House of Representatives-a weak Democratic majority means that a defecting senator may ruin the prospects of the bill. But Democrats in the polls and independents who lean toward the Democratic Party do not think the party is divided. Only 26% of this group said that they think the party is mainly divided, rather than mostly united—comparable to 30% of Republicans and Republican leaners who think the Republican Party is mainly divided.

Despite this, Democratic voters are more helpful to the party in the debate: 49% said that progressives trying to formulate ambitious liberal policies are doing more for Democrats, while 51% said Some believe that moderates are trying to take more measures to control government spending.

Views within the party are ideologically divided, but it is far from universal: the self-proclaimed liberal party, 64% to 36%, aims at ambitious liberal policies, while moderates and conservatives have 61% to 36%. 39% rank behind those dedicated to curbing government spending. There is also a generation gap. People under 45 support progressives, and those 45 and above support moderates.

The poll also found that there is not even a general agreement between what the Democrats and Democrats say they want and what they think is most helpful to the party. Among those who support the development of a broader bill to enact all proposed social safety nets and climate change policies, 60% said that progressives are doing more to help the party, and 40% said moderates. Of those Democrats who support the streamlining bill, 74% said the moderates are doing more work, and 26% said the progressives are.

Eight out of ten Democrats and independents who lean towards Democrats said they approve of Biden’s approach to these negotiations (82% in favor, 18% against). Among those who disapproved, 37% said that Biden did not do enough to support moderates in Congress, while three out of ten said that he did not do enough to support progressives (30%).

Views on Congress

Since April, the approval rate of Congress has dropped slightly, and now 27% of people say they approve of the way Congress handles its work (down from 31%), and 73% say they do not approve (up from 64%). Although this number is very negative, for most of the past ten years, it has been better than congressional approval in a CNN poll; the last time Congress received a net positive work approval rate in that poll was in 2004.

Americans are also divided as to whether Democratic control of Congress is good for the country (36%) or bad for the country (38%). About a quarter of people think this is neither good nor bad (26%).

Despite this, most people still believe that their own members of Congress should be re-elected (55% of people think so), even if the public judges party members more severely. More than six in ten (63%) people said that most Republicans are not worthy of re-election, and most Democrats (54%) also hold the same view. Compared with Republicans (65%), Democrats are more likely to believe that members of their party’s Congress should be re-elected (80%).

The CNN poll was conducted by SSRS on a random national sample of 1,000 adults interviewed online from October 7-11 after using probability-based methods. The sampling error margin of the full sample results is plus or minus 4.2 percentage points, which is even larger for the subgroups.

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