Developer breaks his own app, then claims Aaron Swartz was murdered

Read Time:3 Minute, 49 Second


Stock photo of a lit fuse for a dynamite or firework.

The developer who breached two of his own open-source code repositories, disrupting thousands of apps that used them, has a colorful past, including embracing a QAnon theory involving Aaron Swartz, a well-known hacker activist and programmer, who committed suicide in 2013.

Marak Squires, author of two JavaScript libraries with more than 21,000 dependent applications and more than 22 million weekly downloads, updated his projects late last week as they haven’t changed in over a year. The update contains code that produces an infinite loop, causing the associated application to spit out garbled characters that begin with “Liberty Liberty Liberty”. The update left developers scrambling while trying to fix the glitchy app.

What the hell happened to Aaron Swartz?

Squires didn’t explain the reason for the move, but in the readme file that came with last week’s malicious update, he included the line “What the hell happened to Aaron Swartz?”

Swartz tragically ended his own life after facing federal hacking charges that could land him in prison for 50 years. The charges — alleged computer hacking crimes and wire fraud — stemmed from Swartz logging into an MIT network and stealing millions of academic papers behind paywalls. After being locked out of the MIT Wi-Fi system, he went into the MIT network cabinet and plugged his laptop directly into the campus network.

While he included the cryptic Swartz reference in the README, Squires also tweet Those same words, and included a link to this thread, alleges that Swartz was murdered after child abuse porn was found on MIT servers. This now-deleted post included in the thread states:

No, it’s not Aaron Swartz who should be tried, but that noble institution of learning for hire, MIT, responsible for the heinous crimes that led to his death. The risks Swartz is taking have threatened MIT and can only be understood through the issue of child pornography, orchestrated and crafted by its eminent professors and distributed to their wealthy and powerful sponsors. The MIT cyberpimp caters to a client base that includes the highest echelons of the State Department, major corporations, intelligence agencies, military executives and the White House.

Every element of the Swartz case suggests that he died in a heroic attempt to expose the perversion that corrupted the hearts and minds of the global elite, a heinous and often deadly vice that harms the innocent children and threatens every family on this planet.

There is also evidence that Squires may have been charged with reckless endangerment two years ago in connection with a fire in his Queens, New York, apartment. At the time, a 37-year-old man named Malak Squires was arrested after being taken to a hospital where authorities allegedly observed him behaving erratically as he responded to the fire, according to news reports.

The article described Squires as a software developer and early Bitcoin investor.A month after the fire, Squire report on twitter “Lost everything I had in an apartment fire” and demanded financial support.

Squires did not respond to a message requesting comment on this post.

Throwing wrenches in the supply chain

The disruptions last week raised concerns about the security of the software supply chain, which is critical to a slew of organizations, including Fortune 500 companies. The two broken libraries – Faker.js and Colors.js – caused trouble for people using the Amazon Cloud SDK. Critics have long argued that big companies benefit from the open source ecosystem without adequately compensating developers for their time. In turn, the developers responsible for the software were unfairly pressured.

In fact, Squires said in 2020 that he would no longer support big companies working for free. “Take this as an opportunity to send me a six-figure annual contract, or fork the project and get others involved,” he wrote.

The ability of a single developer to throw a wrench into such a large application base highlights a fundamental weakness in the current structure of free and open source software. Add to that the havoc wrought by overlooked security flaws in widely used open source applications – think last month’s Log4j fiasco or the devastating Heartbleed zero-day attack on OpenSSL systems in 2014 – and you have a potentially catastrophic Tips.




go to see more here in tech news

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. View more
Cookies settings
Accept
Decline
Privacy & Cookie policy
Privacy & Cookies policy
Cookie name Active

Who we are

Suggested text: Our website address is: https://updatednews24.com.

Comments

Suggested text: When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection. An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

Suggested text: If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Cookies

Suggested text: If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year. If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser. When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select "Remember Me", your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed. If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Suggested text: Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website. These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Who we share your data with

Suggested text: If you request a password reset, your IP address will be included in the reset email.

How long we retain your data

Suggested text: If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue. For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

Suggested text: If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Suggested text: Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.
Save settings
Cookies settings