“Dopesick” review: Michael Keaton starred in the Hulu limited series, bringing a comprehensive and dramatic treatment to Purdue Pharmaceuticals and OxyContin

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“Empire” producer Danny Strong did most of the heavy lifting when adapting Beth Macy’s book, writing or co-writing most of the series and directing a few episodes. There are also star lineups and directors such as Barry Levinson and Michael Cuesta. The result is a rich mosaic of OxyContin’s high-risk marketing and Purdue’s use of its financial influence to avoid regulators and attract doctors to prescribe higher doses, with predictable and tragic results.

This is an arduous project that strives to focus on individual roles, but it also presents a huge loss for the entire community, as well as the frustration of the Department of Justice and DEA employees working on parallel tracks. They know that this drug can be addictive, but One obstacle after another is faced in handling these cases.

One of the key roles played by Michael Keaton is Dr. Samuel Finnicks, a rural doctor in a rural town in Virginia. He was reluctant to prescribe OxyContin at first, but was gradually sold by a persistent sales force. The representative (played by Will Poulter) pleased, the latter finally experienced his own pain in Purdue University’s well-designed sales techniques and luxurious seminars, the existence of conscience.

Other key players include Kaitlyn Dever, a Finnix patient, Betsy was injured in mining, which made her increasingly dependent on drugs; Peter Sarsgaard as Rick Mountcastle, led by the U.S. Attorney In this case; Bridget Meyer, a Narcotics Enforcement Agency agent played by Rosario Dawson, has been in conflict with her superiors and other agencies, and some regulatory agencies clearly recognize that, as she As ironically observed, the value of being “friendly to potential future employers”.

Michael Keaton (Michael Keaton) joined the ensemble cast in

“Dopesick” also gave the audience an in-depth understanding of the operation of Purdue University and the strange dynamics of the Sackler family, the most notable of which is the character of Richard Sackler, the company’s chief executive, played by Michael Stuba. Usually a sensational actor, Stuhlbarg played Sackler like a mad scientist in the 1940s monster movie-a distracting (and recurring) series of mistakes, otherwise relatively few.

Again, making Purdue look bad doesn’t require much modification, from executives urging sales representatives to woo doctors to “win their friendship and trust at all costs” to hiding in what sounds like “Appalachian”. “Asia Pain Foundation” sounds like behind the official name. “To understand the use of the product with peace of mind.

“Dopesick” has a perfect companion in Alex Gibney’s detailed HBO documentary “Crime of the Century”, which delves into the origins of the epidemic, including videos of Sackler and ex-employees Interview.

Strong and the company spared no effort to develop these roles, and may have spent too much time in the struggle at home, from a tense marriage in a difficult time to Bessie struggling to appear before her religious parents as a lesbian.

In the end, “Dopesick” worked hard to dramatize a wide-ranging story full of pain and corruption, and bring it home in the most humane way, which is usually not possible for anti-corruption headlines. In terms of getting the attention that this story deserves, as Purdue executives might say, no matter what the price is.

“Dopesick” premiered on Hulu on October 13.

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