First is software, agile is a boon for manufacturing

Read Time:3 Minute, 32 Second


The company focuses on solving the most challenging problems in the early design stages and sprints as a team, before moving into smaller teams for detailed design work. They use rapid feedback loops in simulation and testing to improve designs before going into production.

This focus on agile development and manufacturing has helped Zipline take its unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) from design to commercialization and scaled operations in Ghana and Rwanda in less than 18 months, including six months of Core development and another six months of prototype testing, and final six months of design validation and engineering validation.

“In general, the idea of ​​focusing resources on specific issues in a sprint is something we’re bringing back from the software world to the hardware world,” said Devin Williams, lead mechanical engineer for Zipline’s drone production platform. The good thing is to find the minimum viable product and then prove it in the field.”

Using an agile process allows Zipline to focus on releasing product changes, meeting customer needs quickly, while maintaining high reliability. The San Francisco Bay Area company now has distribution centers in North Carolina and Arkansas, as well as another in Salt Lake City, and will soon launch in new markets in Japan and Africa.

Zipline is not alone. From startups to decades-old manufacturers, companies are turning to agile design, development and manufacturing to create innovative products at lower cost. Aircraft maker Bye Aerospace has more than halved the development cost of electric planes and accelerated the development of prototypes. Boeing used agile processes to win the US Air Force’s TX dual-pilot trainer program.

Overall, applying agile methods should be a priority for every manufacturer. For aerospace and defense companies whose complex projects often follow a long-term vision of waterfall development, agile design and development is needed to propel the industry into the age of urban air mobility and the future of space exploration.

The evolution of traditional product design

While agile production originated in the Kanban method of just-in-time car manufacturing developed by Toyota in the 1940s, modern agile development frameworks were refined in the late 1990s by programmers seeking better methods of producing software. Rather than creating a “waterfall” development pipeline with specific stages (such as design and testing), agile development focuses on creating a working product, the minimum viable product, as early as possible, and then iterating on the technology. In 2000, a group of 17 developers drafted the Agile Manifesto, focusing on working software, individuals and interactions, and customer collaboration.

For the past decade, agile software development has focused on DevOps — “development and operations” — which creates interdisciplinary teams and cultures for application development. Likewise, design firms and product manufacturers have taken the lessons of agile and reintegrated them into the manufacturing lifecycle. As a result, manufacturing is now comprised of small teams, iterating on products, feeding real-world experience back into the supply chain, and using software tools to accelerate collaboration.

In the aerospace and defense industry, known for the complexity of its products and systems, agility is bringing benefits. In developing the TX two-seat jet trainer, Boeing worked to develop a flexible design and manufacturing process that halved program costs for the USAF, improved the quality of initial prototypes by 75 percent, and halved software development time , the assembly time is reduced by 80%.

“We use a flexible mindset and holistic planning approach to hardware and software integration,” said Paul Niewald, Boeing TX program manager. “This allows us to release the software every eight weeks and test it at the system level to validate our requirements. By doing this, and in such a rigorous way – frequency – it allows us to reduce the software effort by 50% .”

Ultimately, it took TX just three years from design to build a “production jet.” This is a major departure from the initial development of traditional aircraft programs, which use waterfall development in the initial design and development phase, which can take up to ten years to develop.

Download the full report.

This content is produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not written by the editorial staff of MIT Technology Review.


go to see more here in tech news

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. View more
Cookies settings
Accept
Decline
Privacy & Cookie policy
Privacy & Cookies policy
Cookie name Active

Who we are

Suggested text: Our website address is: https://updatednews24.com.

Comments

Suggested text: When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection. An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

Suggested text: If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Cookies

Suggested text: If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year. If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser. When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select "Remember Me", your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed. If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Suggested text: Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website. These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Who we share your data with

Suggested text: If you request a password reset, your IP address will be included in the reset email.

How long we retain your data

Suggested text: If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue. For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

Suggested text: If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Suggested text: Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.
Save settings
Cookies settings