No time to die: Safin’s plan requires Bloomfield

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Warning: Major spoilers No time to die

Several key elements of the Safin plan No time to die Without the existence of the former major Bond villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Ernst Stavro Blofeld), there is no point at all. Although Bloomfield does have a prominent place in the narrative, it is clear that he is playing Rami Marek’s Lucifer Safin’s second violin. However, due to the reduction of roles, the entire film was affected, which eventually raised serious questions about the validity of Safin’s so-called master plan.

After taking center stage in 2015 ghost, No time to die Seeing the behind-the-scenes story of Bloomfield in a British prison. Although he still operates in a criminal organization, his power and influence are diminished by imprisonment due to the computer eyes that his colleagues carry with them. This became clear when attempting to use stolen nanobots at a ghost party to kill James Bond inadvertently led to the death of the entire leadership of the ghost. Later, it became clear that Safin was behind the chaos as part of his plan to avenge the ghosts for the death of his family. In the end, after Madeleine Swan infected Blofeld with a nanobot that matched Blofeld’s DNA, Safin managed to successfully assassinate Blofeld through James Bond.

After executing his complicated plan to kill Bloomfield, Safin focused on finding a buyer for his stolen nanorobot technology. This led him to further conflict with Bond, who recognized the potentially devastating impact of the so-called Hercules project. However, although programmable nanorobots may kill anyone they have contacted within a few seconds, which is undoubtedly terrifying, after careful inspection, Safin’s so-called master plan justification is untenable. Not only was it unclear why he had to eradicate so many people, but it was also unclear what his motivation would be once he successfully killed the leader of Spectre.That’s why, in the end, Safin’s plan No time to die Need Blofeld to stand up to scrutiny.

At first, Safin’s plan to kill the ghost as an act of revenge has a certain narrative significance. After all, avenging the death of a family member is a very compelling reason to seek potential doomsday technology. However, after he achieved his early goals, not only was there no emotional significance to continue his plan, but the continuity of the entire project would quickly collapse even after the smallest amount of checks.

For example, individuals like Safin, regardless of their resources or influence, are unlikely to match the tools of global criminal companies such as Spectre. After all, in the early storyline of Craig’s era, Spectre was responsible for pulling the strings behind everyone from Le Chiffre to Raoul Silva-highlighting the extent of its power. Therefore, the idea that an unheard villain with a mysterious backstory can single-handedly defeat the entire organization by persuading a scientist to change its position seems extremely unlikely.

What’s more unusual is that Blofeld and the Ghost, although he poses a clear and real danger to them, seem to be basically unaware of Safin’s true motives. Despite working for Spectre as an assassin, Safin’s revenge plot seems to surprise everyone. The idea that such a person can operate in the criminal underworld and accumulate resources to build his own poison base, while the ghost has not discovered his real plan and the potential threat he poses to the entire operation, this idea seems to push credibility to the limit.

Given that Safin is both a new character in the series, and seems to lack strong motivation after completing the revenge mission, it seems that he may work more effectively as a support hench rather than the central villain. For example, at the request of the imprisoned Blofeld, the idea of ​​Spectre’s chief poisoner tracking James Bond may help viewers ignore the obvious motivational issues that appear in the second and third acts of the movie. This will make Safin and Jaws, Oddjob and Red Grant and others become iconic Spectre partners, rather than burden him with an undue burden on the entire movie.

In fact, once the shadow of the ghost that previously defined the era of Daniel Craig Bond completely disappeared from the scene, the movie can be said to start to flatten out. Although Safin’s desire for revenge provided an interesting shadow for his role, his early success actually undermined the foundation that the previous film had laid for the organization.Therefore, turning Safin into a running dog will be an effective way No time to die Emphasize the dangers posed by Spectre, rather than reduce them to a juggling that a defected scientist can easily eliminate.

In contrast, another plot where Bloomfield is the true mastermind behind the nanobot plot will not only better serve Safin’s character, but will also be a more compelling way to end the Craig era. Storyline. Given the conflict between the two characters in the previous movie, No time to die It could have provided more space for exploring this compelling relationship. For example, it is easy to imagine another storyline in which Bloomfield-with the help of Safin-tried to retaliate against James Bond from prison, perhaps with the same tragic result. This will build on the existing emotional tension in the rest of the saga, rather than just cram in a new villain and start from scratch.

Using Safin as a secondary villain also allows the film to continue the trend that defined Daniel Craig Bond’s film—that is, challenging tradition and pushing boundaries. Throughout the Bond era, followers were usually two-dimensional comics, which, despite their iconic characteristics, lacked proper development. Letting an actor like Malik play this role will allow the movie to do some truly radical things in the supporting role and give himself convincing motivation.Putting him at the center of the action without a truly fascinating story behind his actions will not satisfy anyone in the end and represents a serious mistake No time to die.

One way this movie can include both Safin and Bloomfield is to change Safin’s loyalty. For example, in a world where Bloomfield is jailed, it is not unimaginable that power struggles may erupt at the top of the organization. In order to maintain control of the organization, Bloomfield could therefore recruit Safin to assassinate his opponent on his behalf.

Ironically, this method may also be related to Safin’s revenge plan. Given Blofeld’s age, when Safin’s family was killed at the request of the organization, he was highly unlikely to be responsible for Spectre. However, other senior members of the organization are likely to be involved in the murder, which provides a compelling reason for Safin to cooperate with Bloomfield. In this world, Safin, as a liberated poison expert, could have performed surgery outside, while Bloomfield is still in power in prison.This will help alleviate one of the core issues No time to die By providing two villains with competing and equally compelling motives, it also gives a villain with iconic significance like Bloomfield.

There is no doubt that all aspects of this film provide the right swan song for Daniel Craig’s James Bond era. However, for all the exciting screen actions, including Bond’s heartbreaking final sacrifice, it is undeniable that Bond’s opponents often fail to live up to the rest of the movie. Through some adjustments to the story, it is easy to see how to avoid this problem. that’s all, No time to die It represents a missed opportunity-for Rami Marek’s Safin and the reimagined Ernst Stavro Brofield.



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