Planned Parenthood ransomware attack stole the data of 400,000 patients

Read Time:2 Minute, 13 Second


Ransom information on a monochrome computer screen.

Ransomware hackers broke into the Planned Parenthood network and accessed the medical records or other sensitive data of more than 400,000 patients in the reproductive health group.

The disclosure comes from a sample letter posted to the California Attorney General’s website and a press release issued by the organization. Both said that the intrusion and data theft was limited to patients of the Los Angeles branch of Planned Parenthood. Organizers first noticed the hacking and conducted an investigation on October 17th.

“The investigation determined that an unauthorized person was
October 9, 2021 and October 17, 2021, and some files were stolen from our system during this period,” the letter said. It went on to say: “On November 4, 2021, we determined to include you Documents with his name and one or more of the following: address, insurance information, date of birth, and clinical information, such as diagnosis, surgery, and/or prescription information. “

The press release stated that the intruder “installed malware/ransomware and stole some files from its system during this period.” The organization stated that there was no evidence that the stolen data was used for fraudulent purposes. John Erickson, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles Family Planning Association, did not respond to questions asking whether the organization can rule out this possibility.

Ransomware has become a scourge against Fortune 500 companies and small non-profit organizations. The criminals behind the attacks often blackmail money, threatening not only to lock the victim’s computer network, but also to leak sensitive data online without paying the ransom. There are no reports of any family planning data being released.

In May, hackers used ransomware to attack the Colonial Pipeline, causing the suspension of gasoline delivery in the southeastern United States. A few weeks later, JBS SA, the world’s largest meat producer, suffered a ransomware attack, which caused the closure of five of the largest JBS beef plants in the United States. A Canadian JBS beef factory was also closed, which processed nearly one-third of the cattle that the country’s federal inspections.

At the same time, non-profit organizations are also threatened by ransomware, with hospitals, homeless shelters, and community groups all targeting targets. Earlier this year, data from the Planned Parenthood Branch of the District of Columbia was also seized for ransom.

News of the latest family planning attack comes as the availability of abortion in many states is threatened by state legislatures. On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard an oral argument questioning the constitutionality of Mississippi’s law, which effectively prohibited the procedure after 15 weeks of pregnancy.


go to see more here in tech news

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. View more
Cookies settings
Accept
Decline
Privacy & Cookie policy
Privacy & Cookies policy
Cookie name Active

Who we are

Suggested text: Our website address is: https://updatednews24.com.

Comments

Suggested text: When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection. An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

Suggested text: If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Cookies

Suggested text: If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year. If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser. When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select "Remember Me", your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed. If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Suggested text: Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website. These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Who we share your data with

Suggested text: If you request a password reset, your IP address will be included in the reset email.

How long we retain your data

Suggested text: If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue. For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

Suggested text: If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Suggested text: Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.
Save settings
Cookies settings