Policeman convicted of rape was sentenced to family detention

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Prosecutors announced on Monday that a Baltimore County police officer had been sentenced to home detention on Friday for raping a 22-year-old woman in 2017. 27-year-old Anthony Westerman was convicted of second-degree rape, third-degree rape, and fourth-degree rape in August. Sexual assault and second-degree assault on a 22-year-old woman in October 2017. In addition, Westman was convicted of assaulting another woman in the second degree in June 2019. The prosecutor said that Westerman was off work at the time. Rape and assault. After Westman offered to provide Uber services to a 22-year-old woman from a bar in Whitemarsh, the judge ruled Westman guilty of rape and assault. Four years later, he has been kept at home. But brought her to his house. The prosecutor said and raped her. After Westman was accused of assaulting and raping other women in 2019, this woman came forward in 2019. These cases and the 2017 rape case were heard at the same time. In Friday’s sentencing, Baltimore County Circuit Court Judge Keith Truffer determined that he only intended to convict Westman as a second-degree rape, and combined all the sentences, the prosecutor said. His other charges are also included in his sentence for rape. The judge subsequently sentenced Westman to 15 years’ imprisonment, but the suspended sentence was in addition to 4 years of home imprisonment. Westman will receive probation after being detained at home. “This means that defendants convicted of second-degree rape will serve their sentences in their own homes, which of course is not what we expected or expected,” said Baltimore County Attorney Scott Schellenberg. The judge then allowed Westman to continue to be released to a private family detention facility before he appealed his conviction. The judge sentenced Westerman to one day’s imprisonment for carrying out a second-degree assault on another victim. The prosecutor called it a “rude” behavior that stunned Schellenberg and the victim. Schellenberg said the judge himself convicted two rape charges in the August trial and then dropped one of the convictions on Monday. “We believe that Westerman’s actions in this case have not been punished as they should be,” Schellenberg said. Truffer decided to abandon a rape conviction he had issued in August and stated that there was no evidence that the victim suffered any psychological harm. The prosecution did not provide a letter from the victim’s psychologist. “The victim did tell everyone-she has been receiving psychological counseling since this incident, so I really don’t think the fact that there is psychological harm is controversial, but frankly, we have not received a letter from a psychologist. , But we often don’t. In fact, she has been receiving consultations. This is really not a controversy,” he said. “You can’t be raped and attacked like that without suffering terrible trauma,” said Dorothy Lenin of Ruth House. Lenin was stunned by these words. Both she and Schellenberg worried about the lasting impact of this sentence. “I think this is what makes it difficult for victims, especially victims of sex crimes, to stand up because I think the victims feel that nothing happened to this man,” Lennings said. The wrong message was conveyed not only to the defendant but also to the victims of sexual assault. Through them seeing this sentence, they may reconsider reporting their rape,” Shellenberger said. Westman’s lawyer issued a statement on Monday night, saying: “Officer Westman and his family are breathing a sigh of relief. , Because the judge did not send him to prison is the right thing. We believe that the judgment is contrary to the weight of the evidence. This is a “he said, she said” case, everyone was drunk. The alleged victim waited two years before reporting the crime to the police. The claim that she was in a coma is untrue. She swears to admit that not only was she conscious, but that she engaged in actual encounters with sexual behaviors that were highly inconsistent with non-criminal behavior. We plan to appeal this conviction, and we will not rest until Officer Westman’s name is cleared. “Westman has been suspended by the Baltimore County Police Department without pay since he was charged. On Monday, the police told 11 News that Westman had been fired.

Prosecutors announced on Monday that a Baltimore County police officer was sentenced to home detention on Friday for raping a 22-year-old woman in 2017.

27-year-old Anthony Westerman was convicted in October 2017 on two counts of second-degree rape, third- and fourth-degree sexual offenses, and second-degree assault on a 22-year-old woman. In addition, Westman was also found guilty of conducting a second-degree assault on another woman in June 2019.

Prosecutors said Westman was off work when the rape and assault occurred. He was kept at home until the sentence was pronounced.

Prosecutors said that after Westman offered to provide Uber services to a 22-year-old woman from a bar in Whitemarsh, a judge found Westman guilty of rape and assault, but took her with him. He went to his house and raped her.

This woman came forward in 2019 after Westman was accused of assaulting and raping other women in the same year. These cases are being heard at the same time as the 2017 rape case.

Prosecutors said that at the time of Friday’s sentencing, Baltimore County Circuit Court Judge Keith Truffer determined that he was only planning to convict Westman on one of the second-degree rape crimes and sentenced all other charges. Incorporated into his rape sentence. .

The judge subsequently sentenced Westman to 15 years’ imprisonment, but the suspended sentence was in addition to 4 years of home imprisonment. Westman will receive probation after being detained at home.

“This means that the defendant convicted of second-degree rape will serve his sentence in his own home, which of course is not what we were expecting or looking for,” said Baltimore County Attorney Scott Schellenberg.

The judge then allowed Westman to continue to be released to a private family detention facility before he appealed his conviction.

The prosecutor said that the judge sentenced Westerman to one day’s imprisonment for carrying out a second-degree assault on another victim, calling it “rude” behavior.

This sentence stunned Schellenberg and the victim. Schellenberg said the judge himself convicted two rape charges in the August trial and then dropped one of the convictions on Monday.

Schellenberg said: “We believe that in this case, Westman’s actions will not be punished due to it.”

Schellenberg said that Truffer decided to abandon a rape conviction he ordered in August and said that there is no evidence that the victim suffered any psychological harm. The prosecution did not provide a letter from the victim’s psychologist.

“The victim did tell everyone-since this happened, she has been receiving psychological counseling, so I really don’t think the fact that there is psychological harm is controversial, but frankly, we have not received psychological counseling. Letter from home, but we often don’t do this. In fact, she has been receiving consultations. This is really not a controversy,” he said.

Dorothy Lenning of Ruth’s House said: “If you don’t suffer terrible trauma, you can’t be raped and beaten like that.”

Lenin was stunned by these words. Both she and Schellenberg worried about the lasting impact of this sentence.

“I think this is what makes it difficult for victims, especially victims of sexual crimes, to stand up because I think the victims feel that nothing happened to this man,” Lennings said.

“I think this is really the whole package sending the wrong message not only to the defendant but also to the victims of sexual assault. When they see this sentence, they may reconsider reporting their rape,” Schellenberg said

Westman’s lawyer issued a statement on Monday night, saying: “Officer Westman and his family were relieved that it was the right thing for the judge to not send him to jail. We believe that the verdict is contrary to the weight of the evidence. This is a’he said, she said, “everyone is drunk. The victim allegedly waited more than two years before reporting to the police. The claim that she was in a coma is untrue. She swore to admit that she was not only conscious, but that she was engaged in a sexual act that was highly inconsistent with an unconsensual encounter. We intend to appeal this conviction and we will not rest until the name of Officer Westman is cleared. “

Since Westman was charged, he has been suspended without pay by the Baltimore County Police Department. On Monday, police told 11 News that Westerman had been fired.



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