Space policy finally enters the 21st century

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There has never been more happening in space than today.Business activities exploded In the past five years, private aerospace companies have launched rockets, put satellites into orbit, and bid for moon missions.

But some experts worry that this surge of activity goes far beyond international agreements on who can do what in space. Most of these policies were formulated and passed long before the commercial space sector heated up.

Now, countries realize that they need to update these agreements.This week, the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research Held the annual Outer Space Security Conference In Geneva, Switzerland (participants can choose to participate virtual or in person). For two days, diplomats, researchers and military officials from all over the world gathered to discuss threats and challenges, arms control and space security. Their conversation provided a window into what the new space policy might look like.

Here are some of the most important points.

An arms race may be brewing

Some experts worry that space may become the next battlefield. The use of anti-space technology has been increasing. E.g, Russia with China The anti-satellite missile test has been conducted recently, and the United States already has similar capabilities.

“I think we are witnessing an arms race unfolding,” said Benjamin Silverstein Research analyst for the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace Space Program. “We may have passed the cautious attitude of focusing our main efforts on preventing an arms race.”

Silverstein said that the new policy should not focus on deterrence, but should focus on alleviating the negative impact of this arms race. He urged countries to use the United Nations and its diplomatic resources to clarify and improve relations between hostile actors.

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