The Dancui Rainforest in Australia is owned by aboriginal people

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Some of Australia’s most beautiful natural attractions have been owned by indigenous people, including the Daintree Rainforest in Queensland.

More than 160,000 hectares of land will now be jointly managed by the Queensland State Government and the East Kukuyarangi people, hoping to eventually be transformed into a separate operation by Aboriginal owners.

On Wednesday, September 29, a formal recognition ceremony was held in Bloomfield Town.

“Their culture is one of the oldest in existence, and the return of this land recognizes their right to own and manage their own country,” Environment and Great Barrier Reef Minister Meaghan Scanlon wrote on Twitter.

Chrissy Grant has been a member of the Kuku Yalanji negotiating committee for the past four years.

“Our goal is to build a foundation to provide guidance, training, apprenticeships, work experience and employment opportunities and opportunities for our East Cucuya Ranjibama (people) to fill in various technical industries, land and marine management. , Hotels, tourism and research so that we can control our own destiny,” she said in a statement.

Daintree is considered to be the oldest lowland tropical rainforest in the world. It is located approximately 125 kilometers (78 miles) north of the Cairns Tourism Center and borders the Great Barrier Reef.it is Queensland Wet Tropics UNESCO World Heritage.

When awarded this title in 1988, UNESCO wrote: “This stunningly beautiful area is extremely important for its rich and unique biodiversity.”

A large number of rare plants and animals take Dancui as their home, including Bennett’s tree kangaroo, southern cassowary, waterfall frog, and tube-nosed insectivorous bat. Many of these species cannot be found anywhere else on the planet.

According to Rainforest Rescue, an Australian non-profit organization dedicated to environmental protection, Daintree is home to 30% of Australia’s marsupial species and 20% of reptile species.

This is the second time in a few weeks that the Queensland Government has recognized the traditional aboriginal owners and caretakers of the destination.

Last week, the place formerly known as Fraser Island Officially restored its traditional name, K’Gari, means “heaven” in the local Buchula language. The event held a traditional Butchulla smoking ceremony on September 19th.

Dancui Rainforest photo from Phil Walter/Getty Images.

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